Family Discussions To Have Before Adopting a Puppy


Adopting a new pet isn’t a decision to make on a whim; in fact, your family should have no doubts about it if you decide to go through with it. Although some unexpected things are bound to happen eventually, excessive excitement and enthusiasm from your entire family are telltale signs it’s worth a conversation. Whether you’re unsure or ecstatic about getting a dog, these important family discussions to have before adopting a puppy will help you determine whether it’s the right decision.

What Does Everyone Want?

Before looking for potential dogs to bring home, chat about each family member’s likes and dislikes. Give everyone the chance to voice their opinion about whether they prefer big or small dogs, short or long hair, male or female dogs, etc. This is also the time to consider any potential allergies and whether a larger dog would be too strong for a small child.

Who Is Going To Be the Primary Caregiver?

Deciding who will be the primary caregiver before bringing the puppy home can prevent any arguments and tension. As a parent, it’s essential to understand that your children can’t be entirely responsible for pet care. If a child is the designated caregiver, a parent should be willing to help.

Create a Schedule

Young children may not understand how time-consuming a puppy can be; therefore, writing out a daily routine will help them better understand what to expect. Additionally, creating a schedule for who does what and when will help your family easily adjust to caring for a pet.

Do We Have the Capacity To Raise a Puppy?

Determining whether your family has the capacity to raise a puppy is perhaps the most difficult conversation to have. Whether you like it or not, the supplies to stock up on before bringing home a puppy cost money and take up space.

Physical Space

The physical space in your home should be a critical part of your decision. For example, if your home is so small that there isn’t ample space for your family members, adding a puppy to the mix probably isn’t the best idea. Designating a room or area in your home as a dog zone helps your new pup adjust and makes training more straightforward.

Time

Time is a huge factor when it comes to raising a puppy. It’s no secret that your pup needs to play and socialize, especially at a young age. If your family is constantly away from the house, you may unintentionally neglect your new dog.

Money

Having any pet costs money, but raising a puppy is especially expensive. Every year, you’ll incur dog-related expenses, but it costs anywhere from $600-2,000 in your pup’s first year. 

Hopefully, these family discussions to have before adopting a puppy will help you make the best decision for your household. You and your children may be extremely excited about getting a dog, but a few serious chats will help you gauge if your family is ready to take this huge step together.

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