Help Your Senior Relative Feel More Comfortable With Technology


If you have grown up with innovative technology at your fingertips, it can be easy to underestimate the challenges that many seniors have with learning to use computers and other devices. Fortunately, there are various ways to help your senior relative adapt to an increasingly technology-dependent world.

Here are a few tips to help your elderly loved one feel more comfortable using technology.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

Simplify the Experience

Though computers and phones have seemingly endless features now, what many seniors need is the opposite. By simplifying their experience, you can limit confusion and help them to feel confident using their devices. One way to do this is through one-click applications, like OneLaunch Chromium, that pull up everything they need with a single click of the mouse.

Explain the Benefits

When people have trouble understanding something, they often give up on it. With all the communication and safety benefits of technology, you don’t want your relatives to do the same. Make sure to clearly spell out the advantages of different processes, software, and devices so that they see why integrating it into their life will bring value to them.

Utilize Accessibility Features

Often, seniors have trouble with computers and phones because these devices were not designed with them in mind. Fortunately, most manufacturers have significantly improved their accessibility features to enhance the experience of all people. Make sure to look into the features that could help your loved one feel more comfortable and capable.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

Take Your Time

When helping a relative learn to use something new, be prepared to go slowly. It can be frustrating for both the student and teacher to learn a new skill that may not come naturally. However, patience and understanding can help to alleviate much of the frustration. Make sure that your loved one doesn’t feel rushed.

Focus on Repetition

Repetition is the key to committing anything to memory. You will likely need to demonstrate how to do something multiple times, and then you will need to allow your loved one to practice the new skill on their own. Remember that what may feel intuitive to you will not be for them.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

Provide a Confidence Boost

Most seniors are eager to utilize new tech, but it’s easy to become demoralized when trying to understand something that comes so easily to other people. Make sure to emphasize that learning something new is difficult for everyone and praise your relative when they do something well. You may want to share instances when you had difficulty mastering technology.

Consider Professional Services

Not everyone is a good teacher, and if you find that you are struggling to help your loved one become more comfortable using their devices, you may want to consider hiring a professional to take over. There are many services available that specialize in teaching seniors to make technology work for them. In addition, it could remove an element of stress from your relationship with your relative.

Your loved one doesn’t have to go without the many benefits of technology. By utlizing the right devices and apps, practicing patience, and emphasizing value, you can help your senior relative become comfortable entering the world of technology.

One thought on “Help Your Senior Relative Feel More Comfortable With Technology

  • This is lovely. Great tips. I like the idea of simplicity and repetition as well as being patient. This is sweet. With Covid lots of elderly want to know how to FaceTime and call at a minimum. So thanks for this. Have a wonderful week. Love ❤️ Joni

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s